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Posts from the ‘Lifestyle’ Category

26
Sep

How health coaching can help diabetes patients

With diabetes on the rise, how well employees manage the chronic disease should be a concern for employers, Diana Sherifali, an associate professor at McMaster University’s school of nursing, told Benefits Canada‘s 2018 Healthy Outcomes conference in May.

Since diabetes often comes with other chronic conditions like cardiovascular disease, hypertension and high cholesterol, mitigating it is all the more necessary, she said. In addition, the stress of dealing with the condition can become extreme to the point of being a precursor to moderate depression, she added. Read more »

22
Aug

How much house can I afford?

by Larry MacDonald for Money Sense Magazine

Q: My fiancée Michelle and I are building a custom home together. We have a $1.5 million budget in mind but we’d like to go higher if we can afford to. Or should we actually be spending less? We need to make a decision and we’re not sure what to do.  Darren, Toronto

A: There is no doubt that you guys are in a unique position. Darren, you’re earning the entry level minimum this year, but hope your agent can negotiate a big contract next spring. Your career could last 10 years, but an injury or a bad season could easily cut things short. And it’s hard to say what your potential income-earning ability might be thereafter.

Read more »

1
Jul

Fun Ways to Stop Middle-Age Spread

Need some inspiration to start working out? Here’s some. If you’re physically active throughout early adulthood, you can look forward to a slimmer waist and a trimmer body in midlife than your couch-potato cousins can.

For women, the numbers are dramatic. Their waistlines are typically 1.5 inches smaller and their bodies 13.4 pounds lighter. Guys wind up 5.7 pounds lighter, with waists 1.2 inches smaller. (That translates to about 3 years less disability and 3 years more great sex.) All it takes, according to a new study, is moderate to vigorous exercise for 150 minutes a week — 30 minutes a day, with 2 days off.

Not a Jock in Your Youth?
No worries if sports were never really your thing. Start now. After only 2 months of strength training (three 40-minute sessions a week, including warm-ups), women 65 to 75 years old can recover a decade of muscle loss and men can recover 2 decades.

Here’s how to get started and stick to it:

Read more »

30
Jan

The Changing Face of Health Care in Canada

 

By BrighterLife.ca

Canada’s aging population is going to have a significant impact on our health care needs and costs. According to The Sun Life Canadian Health Index, 90% of Canadians anticipate a financial impact if they were to experience a major or chronic illness. Yet only 58% are financially prepared to cover the cost of a serious illness. Are you prepared?

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20
Jan

Memory-Booster Foods

Sharpen a dull memory with this creamy chip dip: hummus.

Eating foods rich in B vitamins and omega-3s, like hummus, can be a real memory booster, according to Samantha Heller, author of Get Smart. And these nutrients will be especially brain-friendly if you combine them with a few extra ZZZs.

The Hummus Health Benefits
Hummus is a Mediterranean staple made from vitamin B6-rich chickpeas and high-in-omega-3 olive oil — nutrients that Heller says are key to a swift, sharp memory. A spinach salad with a little drizzle of olive oil and vinegar will net you brain-friendly nutrients as well, because spinach is rich in B9. And tuna is another great source of both B vitamins and omega-3s. (Related: Eat your chickpeas whole with this Chickpea, Spinach & Squash Gnocchi recipe from EatingWell.)

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17
Jan

Eat These Chinese Greens to Lower Your Mortality Rate

Show your heart some love and lower your mortality rate by stir-frying this Chinese green: bok choy.

A large-scale study found that people who eat the most vegetables have a reduced mortality rate — especially from heart troubles. But the strongest protective benefits were tied to intake of cruciferous vegetables, like those from bok choy nutrition.

Not All Vegetables Created Equal
The study followed over 100,000 middle-aged men and women in Shanghai, China — a part of the world where people consume lots of veggies, particularly cruciferous ones. And a diet survey there revealed that people whose daily diets included the most vegetables were 15% less likely to have died during the 5-year study period. And the risk of heart disease-related death was particularly low for the vegetable lovers. But the surprising insight? People who consumed the most cruciferous vegetables were the best protected. (Related: Cut your risk of cancer with just this little extra amount of veggies each day.) Read more »