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ARTICLES OF INTEREST

22
Jun

After death of spouse, CPP survivor’s benefit can be a shock

Here’s an important article I wanted to share from CBC News. It addresses some of the scenarios widows and widowers could face if they continue to be reliant on CPP after the death of a spouse.

You can read the article on the CBC Website

24
May

Do Retirees and Empty-Nesters need Life Insurance?

Now that the kids are out of the house, you should be shifting your focus on retirement. Since your money isn’t going towards feeding, clothing, and supporting your children (hopefully), you should be figuring out the best way to maintain your quality of life once you retire.

One of the biggest variables in this scenario is the fact that it’s impossible to know how long your money will have to last. Whether it’s 20 years or 40 years can make a huge difference, particularly if you’re not earning money from various investments.

With that in mind, we want to discuss how retirees (and soon to become retirees) can use insurance to help provide for their health and well-being well into their golden years. You don’t want to be left in the lurch because you failed to plan. Here’s what you can do. Read more »

5
Apr

Prepare Your Kids for the Real World by Turning Monthly Bills into Lessons

By, Carla Hindman, Director of Financial Education, Visa Canada

When you’re a kid, a few dollars can seem like all the money in the world. It can take weeks, sometimes months, to save up your allowance. When you finally decide to spend it, you might realize that $10 or $20 isn’t as much as it seems.

As a parent, you can help your children build important money management skills by providing experiences for them at a young age. Leading by example is a good way to start, and it can help instill good values and money habits. However, you’ll also want your children to get their hands dirty. Read more »

5
Apr

Protecting Estate Values When Your Investments Decline

The total net value of your estate represents what you will leave to your family when you die. It may include the following:

  • Your residence;
  • Cottage or other recreational property;
  • Investment real estate;
  • Stocks, bonds, mutual funds and commodities
  • Life insurance;
  • Any other assets you wish to leave to your heirs.

After paying off any liabilities, taxes arising at death, last expenses etc., what is left over is what your family will use to maintain the lifestyle that you created for them.

Two easy ways to make sure debt and investment losses do not impact the estate you leave for your family Read more »